Competition to win 10,000 free VMS broadcasts to landlines

first_img Howard Lake | 18 November 2004 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. VMS can deliver a large number of messages within minutes and at the same time “keep a campaign as personalised as possible by having a personal voice deliver the message”. As such, Promote-it believe the service can help save on the costs of using traditional call centres for this kind of work.Entries to win 10,000 VMS messages in one calendar month are invited from all UK registered charities. To enter, just tell Promote-It how your charity would use VMS by 30 November 2004. One entry will be selected at random from all entries received and the winning organisation will be contacted via email on the 10 December 2004.VMS works using a Web-based account and a phone number for charities to call to record a specific message. The message could be recorded by a staff member or perhaps a celebrity supporter. Selected phone numbers from the charity’s database are then added to the service, and at the time the charity chooses, their members’ or supporters’ phones start ringing.When they answer, and this includes answering machines, the personal message will be delivered. After listening to the short message recipients then have the option to press a number on the phone which connects them to a person in a call centre; going through to an answer service where they leave their name and number or e-mail; or simply pressing a button that stores their number as someone that acknowledges the call or wants to be taken off the charity’s call list.Promote-it suggest that the service could be used for:renewal of member subscriptionsreminder notices donationsinternal communications in large organisationssurveys emergency messages (cancellation of events etc)For example, it could be used to remind blood donors to turn up to a blood bank: the message might say: “we’re just reminding you that the mobile blood bank will be in your local area on the 19th December: please remember to give generously. Thank you for supporting the service, and we look forward to seeing you for a cup of tea.” Promote-it believe that the service can be used for any marketing or information messages for organisations with a database of members. They also point out that not only does the service save on mail-out costs but it is also a ‘green’ alternative to sending traditional reminders via post. Tagged with: Digital Individual giving Promote-it (UK) is offering a prize of 10,000 Voice Messaging Service (VMS) broadcasts to landlines within a calendar month to the UK charity that wins its competition.Promote-it’s new service allows organisations to deliver a personal voice message, rather than a simple text message, to their supporters or customers.Since it can reach both landline and mobile phones, it can help reach audiences that do not traditionally use mobile phones. Advertisementcenter_img  34 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Competition to win 10,000 free VMS broadcasts to landlineslast_img read more

Celebrities join forces in film trailer for new Wildlife Trusts campaign

first_img“It is desperately sad that so much of our country’s wildlife has been lost since Kenneth Grahame wrote his wonderful book The Wind in the Willows. Of all the characters in the book it is hard to know whose descendants have suffered the most. Water Voles, Toads and Badger’s friends in the book, Hedgehogs, have all seen catastrophic declines.“I am backing The Wildlife Trusts’ campaign to rally people to secure a ‘wilder future’ by restoring large areas of wildlife habitat, in city and country. What we create may not look exactly like the countryside that Kenneth Grahame drew such inspiration from, but our wildlife won’t mind just so long as it has the places it needs to live and thrive.“As a society we know how to put meanders back into straightened rivers and how to build bridges for wildlife. We know which wild places we should be protecting and expanding. But we need ambitious new laws to ensure we do this, laws that ensure we map out nature’s recovery. Meanwhile we can all make a practical difference. Together we can make the next chapter for wildlife a happier one.”  383 total views,  5 views today Celebrities join forces in film trailer for new Wildlife Trusts campaign Currently there is no legislation to help nature recover, and The Wildlife Trusts aims to build support for strong environmental laws and for a Nature Recovery Network.The charity hopes that the trailer will inspire people to help by nature by contacting politicians to call for strong environmental laws to help nature recover, creating new homes for wildlife in their garden or local area, and checking out the events and volunteering opportunities at local Wildlife Trusts. Sir David Attenborough, Stephen Fry, Catherine Tate, Alison Steadman and Asim Chaudhry are supporting a new campaign from The Wildlife Trusts that calls for more help to restore nature.The Wildlife Trusts #WilderFuture campaign launches today (28 March) and will see an animated film trailer starring Wind in the Willows characters Mole, Ratty, Badger and Toad play across 500 cinemas in the UK for the next week. The film is also being released on social media, and is available for viewing on the charity’s site.The trailer shows how the lives of Badger, Ratty, Mole and Toad are disrupted by roads, river pollution and intensive agriculture, and calls people to join the campaign by committing to play their part in nature’s recovery. [youtube height=”450″width=”800″]https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=3&v=JZYcoeqzxVI[/youtube] Melanie May | 28 March 2019 | Newscenter_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis11 Tagged with: Celebrity Volunteering Stephanie Hilborne, CEO of The Wildlife Trusts, said:“We are a nation of nature-lovers, yet we live in one of the most nature-depleted countries in the world. If we want to put nature into recovery we have to create a mass movement of people calling for change. Our film is a sad version of The Wind in the Willows – showing how Ratty and Toad have hit the buffers – but it ends with a message of real hope. It’s not too late to create strong laws which will help our wildlife make a comeback – and it’s not too late to establish a Nature Recovery Network which will enable us to plan a wilder future.”Sir David Attenborough (c) The Wildlife TrustsPresident Emeritus of The Wildlife Trusts and narrator of the film trailer, Sir David Attenborough added: Advertisement  384 total views,  6 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis11 About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more