Press freedom violations recounted in real time (from 1st January 2010)

first_imgThere were detained by men in plain-clothes who had come with an arrest warrant for Ali Hekmet, another member of the Press Freedom Defence Committee, and once there, arrested them instead. Ahmadi was released a few hours later but the two journalists, and Mashaallah Shamsolvaezin, the committee’s spokesman, who was arrested on 28 December, are still being held in an unknown location. ———- Journalist Sasan Aghaei, of the daily Farhikhteghan was released on bail on 28 March, after 120 days in custody. ———— Reporters Without Borders has learned of the release of four journalists and bloggers, on 7 and 8 March:- Mehrdad Rahimi, blogger arrested on 2 January, was released on 8 March.- Yashar Darolshafa, netizen arrested on 2 February, was freed on 8 March.- Ahmad Jalali Farahani, contributor to Meher News arrested on 7 February, was released on 8 March.- Zeynab Kazem-Khah, journalist on ISNA, arrested on 7 February, was freed on 7 March. Reporters Without Borders confirms the arrests of four other journalists.- 2 February, arrest of Ali Malihi, journalist on the daily Etemad in Tehran- 6 February arrest of Naimeh Dostar in Tehran – 9 February, arrest of Hamid Mafi, journalist for several local and national newspapers, including Hadiss Qazvin and Farhangh Ashti in the city of Qazvin, northern Iran – 9 February, arrest of Hamid Ghaznavian, journalist and children’s rights activist, in Qazvin Omid Montazeri, a journalist on Shargh and Kargozaran and a contributor to several newspapers, was arrested on 28 December 2009 and sentenced on 30 January 2010 to six years in jail by the 15th chamber of the Tehran revolutionary court. His lawyer was not permitted to attend the hearing. As a roundup continues in Iran of opposition and media figures orchestrated by the Ministry of Intelligence and Revolutionary Guards, Reporters Without Borders voiced dismay at the arrests of Rozbeh Karimi, Mehrdad Rahimi, Behrangh Tonkaboni, Kivan Farzin, Mehdi Ghilani and Farshad Azizi. The worldwide press freedom organisation has heard nothing more of several other Iranian journalists and bloggers who were also reportedly taken into custody recently. ———— —————29 March 2010 – Prisoners bailed or released on licence to mark Iran’s New Year Parisa Kakaei , a journalists and blogger (http://parisad.blogspot.com/), was arrested today after being summoned by the intelligence ministry. She was reportedly transferred to Tehran’s Evin prison. Omid Mehregan, journalist on the opinion pages of several newspapers, was released yesterday while awaiting trial, after 15 days in custody. Mazyar Sameii, contributor to several literary magazines, including Naghad noo, was freed on 17 February while awaiting trial. Reporters Without Borders has learned of the release on 13 March of three journalists and bloggers:* Vahid Pourostad, a blogger arrested on 8 January 2010* Lilli Farhadpour, a contributor to Meher News, arrested on 7 February* Somayeh Momeni, a journalist on Nasim Bidary, arrested on 7 February These journalists were all released on bail while awaiting trial. Masoud Bastani, a journalist on the daily newspaper Farhikhteghan, was transferred on 24 January to a prison outside of Tehran.He was arrested on 4 July 2009 and had been held since then at Evin prisonin the capital. He was tried, along with many other journalists, in aseries of “show trials” in Tehran from August onwards. He was sentenced tosix months in prison by the 15th chamber of the revolutionary court on 1stNovember.Neither his lawyer nor his family was given any reason for this unusualtransfer. His wife, journalist Mahsa Amrabadi said, ”They transferred himto another prison to put him under even more pressure”. Bastani has told his family that he was in a cell with four common-law criminals, all of whom are under sentence of death. ——– However, several other journalists, whose situation is very worrying, were denied the right to visits or were not allowed releases on licence. One of them was Masud Lavassani, a journalist and blogger arrested on 26 September and sentenced in December 2009 to eight years in jail. Another such case was that of human rights activist and reformist journalist Mehdi Mahmudian, who was arrested on 16 September. At the request of these journalists’ families, Reporters Without Borders had not added their names to its barometer. The legal authorities also allowed three journalists a release on licence. They were: Bahaman Ahamadi Amoee, Kivan Samimi Behbani and Saide Lylaz, held since June 2009 and sentenced to prison terms of three to six years. The legal authorities also allowed three journalists a release on licence. They were: Bahaman Ahamadi Amoee, Kivan Samimi Behbani and Saide Lylaz, held since June 2009 and sentenced to prison terms of three to six years. The state of health of Nader Karimi, a journalist on several publications including Gozaresh, Feker and Syasat rouz, is giving rise to very serious concern. He is suffering from several illnesses relating to a wound dating back to the Iran-Iraq war of 1980-1988 and requiring specialised nursing care. He was arrested in Tehran on 21 November 2008 for an alleged breach of the country’s security and for espionage. He was sentenced to ten years in prison by the 28th chamber of the Tehran Revolutionary Court. Mazadk Ali Nazari, editor of the website Journalists for peace, was freed on bail on 8 February while awaiting trial. He had been arrested in Tehran on 1st November 2009. 1st March 2010 – Five released, two arrested, two convicted Intelligence ministry agents arrested journalist Rozbeh Karimi, who worked for the currently banned dailies Shargh and Kargozaran, at his home along with his wife, Forough Mirzai, on 2 January, to go further Journalist Mostafa Izadi of Etemad-e Melli (a newspaper that was closed by the authorities last July) was released on bail on 1 February pending trial. He had been held for 34 days. Azad Lotpoury, the editor of the Kurdish and Farsi-language newspaper Yaneh, was released on 28 January on payment of 40 million toman (35,000 euros) in bail. Ali Moazemi, a journalist on the opinion pages of several newspapers and director of the blog “Here and now“, was arrested on 7 March 2010,after being summoned by the intelligence ministry. His family have had no news since of the reason for this arrest of where he is being held. ——- Six arrests reported in the past few days means that the total of journalists and netizens held in Iran now surpasses 60. The latest to be arrested were Omid Mehregan, who writes opinion pieces for several pro-reform newspapers, and Noushin Jafari, who writes for the arts and literature pages of the daily Etemad. Plain-clothes men went to their home on 3 February and took them off to an unknown location. Hamid Mafi, journalist for several local and national newspapers, including Hadiss Qazvin and Farhangh Ashti in the northern city of Qazvin, arrested on 9 February 2010, Ehsan Mehrabi, journalist on the daily Farhikhteghan and journalist and blogger Naimeh Dostar were all released on 13 March. March 18, 2021 Find out more 19 March 2010 – Two releases Ali Kalai, arrested on 7 February, Ardavan Tarkameh, arrested on 27 January and Parisa Kakaei, a journalist and director of a blog (http://parisad.blogspot.com/) arrested on 2 January 2010, were also released on bail while awaiting trial. ——– —————- Sussan Mohamadkhani Ghiassvanad, a writer and online journalist, was arrested by intelligence ministry agents at her home in the city of Karaj on 11 March 2010. She managed to contact her family two days later. She is currently being detained in Ghezel Hessar jail. The state of health of Nader Karimi, a journalist on several publications including Gozaresh, Feker and Syasat rouz, is giving rise to very serious concern. He is suffering from several illnesses relating to a wound dating back to the Iran-Iraq war of 1980-1988 and requiring specialised nursing care. He was arrested in Tehran on 21 November 2008 for an alleged breach of the country’s security and for espionage. He was sentenced to ten years in prison by the 28th chamber of the Tehran Revolutionary Court. ———-7th March 2010 Follow the news on Iran ——— 29 March 2010 – Prisoners bailed or released on licence to mark Iran’s New Year 17 February 2010 – Arrests, orchestrated by the intelligence ministry and the Revolutionary Guards, continue in Iran June 22, 2010 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Press freedom violations recounted in real time (from 1st January 2010) 5 March 2010 – Some journalists released but arrests of netizens continues 8 June 2010 – One-year prison sentence against blogger and women’s rights activistBlogger, journalist and women’s rights activist, Jila Bani Yaghoob, was informed on 8 June that the 26th Chamber of the Tehran Revolutionary Court had sentenced her to one year in prison and banned her from working as a journalist for 30 years.Yaghoob and her husband Bahaman Ahamadi Amoee were arrested on 20 June 2009 with around 20 other journalists during demonstrations that followed the contested re-election of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad as Iranian president. She was released on 24 August but her husband was sentenced to five years in prison.Badrolssadat Mofidi, Secretary General of the Association of Iranian Journalists and a contributor to several newspapers, was freed on 7 June on payment of bail of 100 million tomans (75,000 euros). She was arrested on 28 December 2009 and held in section 29 of Evin prison. ———7 June 2010 – Release of a journalist Reporters Without Borders has learned of the release on 1st June of Mohammad Sadegh Javadihessar, an editorialist on the banned daily Etemad-e Melli. The journalist had been arrested on 30 December 2009 after being summoned by the intelligence ministry. His home was searched for seven hours. Azam Vismeh, online journalist with Parlemannews, the official website of the reformist parliamentarians, and Mahbobeh Khanssari, a contributor to the agency Cultural Heritage, who were arrested at their homes on 1st June, were only able to tell their families of their detention at Evin jail on 5 and 6 June 2010. IranMiddle East – North Africa —– Hamid Mafi, journalist for several local and national newspapers, including Hadiss Qazvin and Farhangh Ashti in the northern city of Qazvin, arrested on 9 February 2010, Ehsan Mehrabi, journalist on the daily Farhikhteghan and journalist and blogger Naimeh Dostar were all released on 13 March. RSF_en Reporters Without Borders has learned of the release yesterday of four journalists and bloggers:- Abdolreza Tajik, freelance journalist committed free expression activist and contributor to the daily Farhikhteghan, who was arrested on 28 December 2009, – Behrangh Tonkaboni, journalist on Farhangh é ahangh, arrested on 5 January 2010, – Rozbeh Karimi journalist for Shargh and Kargozaran, who was arrested on 2 January 2010, – Mashaallah Shamsolvaezin, spokesperson for the Iranian Journalists’ Association and the Committee for the Defence of Freedom of the Press, who was arrested on 28 December 2009. Two journalists were released on bail on 17 March pending trial: Akbar Montajabi of the closed daily Etemad-e Melli, who was arrested on 7 February, and Bahaman Ahamadi Amoee of the closed daily Sarmayeh, who was arrested on 20 June 2009. Organisation Reporters Without Borders also learned of the release of four journalists on 18 and 19 March 2010: Ali Moazemi, journalist on the opinion pages of several newspapers and director of the blog “Here and Now”, arrested on 7 March 2010; Kivan Farzin, journalist on Farhangh é ahangh arrested on 5 January. Two journalists on the cultural monthly, who were arrested at the same time as Farzin, Behrangh Tonkaboni, and Arvin Sedaghat Kish, were freed on 28 February. Blogger Ali Anjam Rooz was arrested at his home during a search by plain-clothes intelligence ministry agents on 27 February. It is not known either why he was arrested or where he is being held. Several journalists and bloggers have been freed on bail while awaiting trial or released on licence, to mark Iranian New Year. Lilli Farhadpour, an Iranian journalist and writer, was arrested at his home on 21 January 2010. His son, Behrangh Tonkaboni, editor of the cultural monthly Farhangh é ahangh (Culture and Harmony), was arrested on 5 January. Receive email alerts However, Reporters Without Borders learned of the arrest on 25 February of the journalist Henghameh Shahidi, after she was summoned by the intelligence ministry. She was taken to Evin jail and two days later sentenced on appeal by the 54th chamber of the Tehran court to six years in prison and a fine of 50,000 tomans. Her lawyer, Mr Mostafaei, said, “The speed of sentencing is astounding. The verdict was upheld the very next day after the journalist’s arrest. Emadoldin Baghi, journalist and leading human rights figure in Iran, was denied the right to spend the New Year with his family, despite putting up bail in a significant sum. Meanwhile, journalist Nassrin Vaziri of the ILNA news agency was released on 20 January subject to a guarantee that she would be present for her trial. She had been held in the capital’s Evin prison since her arrest on 28 December. Without saying why she was arrested, Tehran prosecutor Abass Jafari Dolatabadi said: “The investigation of her case is complete so she has been freed.” ——-center_img Also on 14 January, two journalists from the newspaper Atrak, Mehdi Ghilani and Farshad Azizi, were released on bail set at 100 million tomans (about 75,000 euros) while awaiting trial. They were arrested respectively on 6 and 7 January 2010, following bloody clashes involving students at Ferdowsi University in Mashhad. ———–2 June 2010 – Two women journalists arrestedReporters Without Borders has learned that two women journalists and bloggers who work for pro-reform newspapers and websites were arrested at their homes yesterday by men in plain-clothes. They are Azam Vismeh, who works for Parlemannews, the official website of the pro-reform parliamentarians, and Mahbobeh Khanssari, who writes for the Cultural Heritage agency. The reasons for their arrest and their place of detention are still unknown.Journalist and researcher Mohammad Norizad’s sentence of three and a half years in prison and 50 lashes was confirmed on 29 May by a Tehran appeal court. Norizad, who kept a blog (http://mohammadnurizad.blogfa.com/), was convicted on charges of anti-government publicity and insulting the authorities.Norizad worked for several years as a columnist for the daily Kayhan, the leading mouthpiece of Iran’s conservatives. Following President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s disputed reelection in June 2009, he began to openly criticise the Supreme Leader of the Revolution, the government and the judicial system.Bahaman Ahamadi Amoee, a journalist who worked for the now closed daily Sarmayeh, was returned to Tehran’s Evin prison on 29 May after two months of conditional release. He is serving the five-year jail sentence he received following his June 2009 arrest. On the day he was returned to prison, the trial of his wife, fellow-journalist Jila Baniyaghoob, began before a Tehran revolutionary court. She is accused of propaganda against the Islamic Republic. Arrested together with her husband at their Tehran home on 20 June 2009, she was released on 20 August 2009 on payment of 100 million toman (90,000 euros) in bail.Mazyar Khosravi, the editor of the Hammihannews (http://hammihannews.com/news/9857) website, has been released pending trial. He was arrested in Tehran on 2 May on a charge of publishing false information because he allegedly posted reports and eye-witness accounts about an attack on the university campus by Basij militiamen on 14 June 2009, two days after President Ahmadinejad’s disputed reelection. Many students were serious injured in the raid and, according to some sources, five were killed. The BBC broadcast video footage of the attack.——————30 May 2010 – Arrests of journalists continueAzeri journalist Akbar Azad, a contributor to the magazine Varlighe and the weekly Yarpagh, one of Iran’s leading Azeri-language newspapers, was arrested at his Tehran home by several men in plain clothes on 25 May. When previously arrested on 10 September 2008, he spent 50 days in solitary confinement in Section 209 of Tehran’s Evin prison and was released only after payment of 50 million toman in bail.Two other Azeri journalists are currently detained. They are Said Matinpour of Yarpagh and Rahim Gholami, a contributor to several local newspapers in the northwestern city of Ardabil. Arrested on 11 July 2009, Matinpour has breathing problems that have not received the necessary medical treatment in prison. Gholami has been held since 29 October 2009.Two journalists who were arrested on 15 May, Ramin Jabary and Mostafar Jamishidei, were subsequently released pending trial. They each had to pay 15 million toman in bail. Jabary was freed on 17 May. Jamishidei was freed on 27 May. There have been more arrests of journalists in the past few days. Mohammad Sadegh Javadihessar, a columnist for the now-closed daily Etemad-e Melli, was arrested on 30 December after receiving a summons from the intelligence ministry the same day. Books and his computer’s hard disk were confiscated during a seven-hour search of his home. His family has received no word of him since his arrest. Kaveh Ghassemi Kermanshahi, a journalist who is a member of the Committee of Human Rights Reporters, was arrested by intelligence ministry agents at his home on 2 February. It is not known where he is being held. News Several human rights activists were arrested on the same day, among them the blogger and activist Naghipour Nasour. The director of the website http://www.nasour.net/ was arrested at home in Qazvin by agents in plain-clothes. The reasons for his arrest and the place in which he is being detained are still unknown. 5 February 2010 – New arrests bring total of journalists and netizens held to more than 60 Elsewhere, Alireza Saghafi, editor of the magazine Rah Ayandeh (banned in May 2008) and member of the Iranian Writers Association, was released on 14 February. He had been sentenced to three years in prison by Tehran’s revolutionary court. He was previously arrested on 1st May, one hour ahead of demonstrations called to mark the 1st May, and had been released on bail of 70 million tomans on 10 June 2009. ——— Maziar Samiee and Yashar Darolshafa, two journalists who contribute to Sarpiche, a news website that can no longer be accessed, were also arrested at their home on 2 February and taken to an unknown location. Sameii writes for several literary reviews such as Naghad Noo as well. ———- News 22 January 2010 – New arrest Also on 2 January, Mehrdad Rahimi, who is director of the blog (http://shahidayeshahr.blogfa.com// ), was arrested after being summoned by the intelligence ministry and she has reportedly been taken to Evin prison. However, several other journalists, whose situation is very worrying, were denied the right to visits or were not allowed releases on licence. One of them was Masud Lavassani, a journalist and blogger arrested on 26 September and sentenced in December 2009 to eight years in jail. Another such case was that of human rights activist and reformist journalist Mehdi Mahmudian, who was arrested on 16 September. At the request of these journalists’ families, Reporters Without Borders had not added their names to its barometer. Shahidi had previously been arrested on 29 June 2009 when she spent 50 days in solitary confinement in section 209 of Evin prison. She had been released on 2 November 2009 on the order of the 26th chamber of the Tehran revolutionary court, on putting up bail of 9,000,000 tomans (8,000 euros). The weekly Hemat, a conservative pro-government publication, was suspended on 14 January 2010 on the order of the Tehran prosecutor for “insulting highly placed officials of the regime”. It was the paper’s second ban in less than a month, and for the same reason. Hemat had carried a photo on its front page of former president, Hashemi Rafsanjani, flanked by several other figures in the regime and captioned “Rafsanjani’s men”. Iran’s Press Authorisation and Surveillance Commission, the censorship arm of the Islamic Culture and Orientation Ministry, suspended Hemat on 4 February 2009. The paper was allowed to publish again two months later. Iran: Press freedom violations recounted in real time January 2020 Two journalists working on the newspaper Atrak, Mehdi Ghilani and Farshad Azizi, were arrested on 6 and 7 January 2010, after bloody clashes at a student demonstration at Ferdowsi University in Mashhad. They are being held at an undisclosed location. ——– News Ahmadinejad Foad Sadeghi, director of the website Ayandenews, was arrested at his workplace on 12 February and taken to an unknown destination. The online journalist who founded the now-censored website Baztab is close to Mohsen Rezai, former commander of the Revolutionary Guard and a candidate at the 12 June 2009 elections. Ayandenews has been blocked several times since 12 June for posting news about demonstrations and for failing to respect the official line. Mohammed Ali Ramin, a loyal adviser to President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, has repeatedly warned and threatened media, especially print media, since taking over as deputy minister of culture and Islamic guidance in October. A warning is often the first step towards a newspaper’s definitive closure. A charge of “insulting the president” is the legal method most often used by Ramin to stop newspapers publishing criticism of Ahmadinejad. After Hengameh Shahidi’s pardon, RSF asks Supreme Leader to free all imprisoned journalists 19 February 2010 – Five released Behrangh Tonkaboni, editor of the cultural monthly Farhangh é ahangh (Culture and Harmony), and journalist Kivan Farzin, were arrested at their workplace on 5 January. The newspaper’s main office was searched and computers and books seized. At the same time intelligence ministry agents searched the home of Tonkaboni’s mother, Lilli Farhapour, who is also a journalist and writer. Reporters Without Borders learned on 3 March of the release of three journalists: – Noushin Jafari, journalist for Etemad, arrested on 3 February – Reza Norbakhsh, editor of the daily Farhikhteghan, arrested at his workplace in Tehran on 4 August, and who had been sentenced to six years in prison for “taking part in illegal demonstrations” and for articles posted on the news website Jomhoryat- Mortaza Kazemian, journalist for several reformist newspapers, arrested on 28 December 2009, was released after spending 34 days in solitary confinement in section 209 of Evin prison. Journalist Said Laylaz had his sentence of nine years in jail reduced to three years by the Tehran appeal court. Kambiz Norrozi, head of the Association of Iranian Journalists, sentenced on 17 November to two years in jail and 76 strokes of the whip for making “publicity against the regime and disturbing public order”, had his sentence reduced on appeal to one year in prison. 16 March 2010 Journalist Sasan Aghaei, of the daily Farhikhteghan was released on bail on 28 March, after 120 days in custody. Reporters Without Borders also learned of the release of four journalists on 18 and 19 March 2010: Ali Moazemi, journalist on the opinion pages of several newspapers and director of the blog “Here and Now”, arrested on 7 March 2010; Kivan Farzin, journalist on Farhangh é ahangh arrested on 5 January. Two journalists on the cultural monthly, who were arrested at the same time as Farzin, Behrangh Tonkaboni, and Arvin Sedaghat Kish, were freed on 28 February. 29 January – Transfer These journalists were all released on bail while awaiting trial. 8 January 2010 – Daily arrests 15 January 2010 – Suspension Call for Iranian New Year pardons for Iran’s 21 imprisoned journalists ——- Help by sharing this information Kivan Samimi Behbani, a freelance journalist and former editor of the independent monthly Nameh (The Letter) that was banned in 2005, who was arrested on 13 June 2009, was sentenced on 2 February to six years in prison. He was also banned from carrying out any political or journalistic activity. He has come under substantial pressure to renounce his humanitarian commitment and was recently transferred into a single cell in section 209 of Evin jail. Emadoldin Baghi, journalist and leading human rights figure in Iran, was denied the right to spend the New Year with his family, despite putting up bail in a significant sum. Nemat Ahmadi, a lawyer who represents several imprisoned journalists, Mahsa Hekmet, another Etemad-e Melli journalist, and Mohammed Reza Zohdi, the former editor of the now closed newspaper Arya, who now writes for several other pro-reform newspapers and is a member of the Press Freedom Defence Committee, were arrested yesterday and were taken to an unknown location. News In a continuing crackdown on the media in Iran, 15 newspapers received warnings this week for publishing comments by former reformist President Mohammad Khatami or former chief nuclear negotiator Hassan Rohani on the way the authorities have been handling the country’s crisis. The 15 newspapers targeted by the latest warnings were Tehran Emrouz, Arman Ravabet Omoumi, Farhikhtegan, Jomhouri Eslami, Asrar, Etemad, Jahan-e San’at, Poul, Afarinesh, Rouzan Etemad, Etelaat, Tose’e, Rouzan, Mardom Salari and Bahar. IranMiddle East – North Africa Several journalists and bloggers have been freed on bail while awaiting trial or released on licence, to mark Iranian New Year. ——Website editor arrested for video of university campus attacksMazyar Khosravi, the editor of the Hammihannews (http://hammihannews.com/news/9857) website, was arrested on 2 May in Tehran on a charge of publishing false information as a result of a Tehran University complaint accusing him of posting reports and eye-witness accounts about attacks on the university campus by Basij militiamen on 14 June 2009, two days after President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s disputed reelection.Many students were serious injured in the attacks and, according to some sources, five students were killed. See a BBC report on the subject: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_GVfGLJO4Iw&feature=player_embeddedReporters Without Borders has meanwhile learned of the release of the following four journalists and bloggers pending trial:- Mojtaba Gahestoni, the editor of the Sokhango.blogfa.com (http://sokhango.blogfa.com) website, who was arrested on 2 March and released on 4 April- Said Jalali, a blogger and contributor to the Human Rights Rapporteurs Committee, who was arrested on 1 December 2009 and released on 29 March- Said Kalnaki, a blogger and member of the Human Rights Rapporteurs Committee, who was arrested on 1 December 2009 and released on 13 March- Foad Shamss, a blogger who was arrested on 30 November 2009 and released on 10 March.“We are in prison because we are journalists”Around 20 imprisoned journalists issued a joint letter for World Press Freedom Day on 3 May in which they protest against their detention. The letter, which is circulating online, says: “This year, we bloggers and journalists are celebrating World Press Freedom Day in prison. We have been jailed and given unjust sentences for wanting to inform, for writing articles, for carrying out interviews and for participating in the debate about freedom and democracy. Purely and simply for doing our duty as journalists.”Reporters Without Borders has also learned that Ali Mohammad Islampour, the editor of the pro-reform newspaper Navai Vaghat, who had been arrested on 3 February, was released provisionally on 3 March, and that Omid Montazeri, a journalist with the pro-reform newspapers Shargh and Kargozaran, was released provisionally on 5 April. Journalist Abolfazl Abedini Nasr was arrested at his home in the city of Ahvaz on 2 March by several men in plain clothes. The men, who all wore hoods, broke down the door of his house and brutally beat him. He had been earlier arrested on 30 June 2009 and freed on 26 October after putting up bail of 300 million tomans (270,000 euros). Ali Hekmet, a member of the Committee for the Defence of Freedom of the Press, who was arrested on 2 January, was freed on 27 February. These five journalists were all released on bail while awaiting trial. Niloufar Lary, a journalist with the magazine Chehel Cheragh, was arrested on 1 February when she responded to a summons to report to the intelligence ministry. Computers and books were seized when a search of her home was carried out in the evening after her arrest. When intelligence ministry agents searched the home of fellow Sarpiche contributor Ardavan Tarkameh, on 2 February, they arrested his sister, Bahar Tarkameh, and took her off to an unknown location. Computers and books were seized during the raid. It turns out that Ardavan was himself arrested on 27 December at the home of Omid Montazeri, one of the 16 defendants in a new trial of government opponents that opened before a Tehran revolutionary court on 30 January. June 9, 2021 Find out more On 2 March, Mojtaba Gahestoni, director of the website Sokhango (spokesman), was arrested in the city of Ahvaz. 2 January 2010 – More arrests of journalists in Tehran 21.01.2010 – Government warns 15 newspapers 22 June 2010 – More newspapers forced to close, more arrests The magazine Education Culture was closed for good on 20 June by the Commission for Press Authorisation and Surveillance, which answers to the Ministry of Culture and Islamic Guidance. The commission also issued a warning to three other magazines. One of the editors of the business daily Pool said on 19 July that it was suspending publication “in order to review the newspaper’s policies.” The announcement follows a warning from the Commission for Press Authorisation and Surveillance accusing it of publishing “false information” in its articles about the government’s monetary policies. The newspaper has been subjected to a great deal of harassment for the past year. The sports daily Donya e Varzesh (World of Sport) meanwhile stopped publishing last October after getting a warning in response to an article reporting that Revolutionary Guards had bought lots of tickets for a football match so that the stadium would not be full of demonstrators. Journalist and blogger Ebrahim Rashidi notified his family by telephone on 17 June that he had been arrested by intelligence ministry officials in the northwestern city of Ardabil. Rashidi, who writes for the weekly Bayram, had been missing since 14 June. Reporters Without Borders has learned that Akbar Azad, an Azeri journalist who was arrested in Tehran on 25 May, has been transferred to a prison in Tabriz, in the northwestern province of East Azerbaijan. The organisation has also learned that Nasour Naghipour, a blogger who was arrested in March, has been released pending trial after payment of 100 million toman (75,000 euros) in bail.—— ————Press freedom violations recounted in real time – JUNE/DECEMBER 2009 February 25, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

SCAORA Formulates Scheme For One Time Assistance Of Rs 10,000 To Needy Members

first_imgTop StoriesSCAORA Formulates Scheme For One Time Assistance Of Rs 10,000 To Needy Members LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK19 May 2020 12:31 AMShare This – xThe Supreme Court Advocates On Record Association (“SCAORA”) has resolved to introduce a new COVID-19 Financial Assistance Scheme for the period between May 18 and May 31.Through this scheme, a one-time ex-gratia amount of Rs. 10,000 can be availed by advocates who are eligible according to the terms laid down in the Resolution.In a virtual meeting convened by the Executive Committee (EC) on…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Supreme Court Advocates On Record Association (“SCAORA”) has resolved to introduce a new COVID-19 Financial Assistance Scheme for the period between May 18 and May 31.Through this scheme, a one-time ex-gratia amount of Rs. 10,000 can be availed by advocates who are eligible according to the terms laid down in the Resolution.In a virtual meeting convened by the Executive Committee (EC) on May 18, it was decided that benefits of the scheme would be extended to AORs as well as advocates whose names appear in the Supreme Court Bar Association (SCBA) voters list of 2019. Other advocates, covered under special categories, who are in dire need of financial aid on account of the ongoing lockdown shall also be avail of the benefits of the scheme.In order to avail benefits of the scheme, those eligible are required to furnish a declaration/undertaking with details regarding their AOR Code in case of AORs, or alternatively their SCBA membership number along with a statement confirming the appearance of their name in the 2019 SCBA voters’ list. Furthermore, the annual income of an applicant must be less than Rs. 8 lakh to qualify as a beneficiary of the scheme and the application must reveal a dire need of financial aid due to grave financial hardships being faced during the lockdown. The AOR or eligible Advocate must also declare that they have not received any COVID-19 related assistance or benefit from any Bar Association during this period.Subject to the approval of the EC, an active member of SCBA could be exempted from the condition of their name appearing in the 2019 Voter List and avail benefits of the scheme if the advocate is either in dire need of financial aid due to certain medical conditions/situations, a single woman or the widow of an AOR (since 2015).With regard to applications, SCAORA has also clarified the following-“The identity of the AOR/Advocate seeking benefit under the Scheme will be kept strictly confidential.Each application will be scrutinized as to its veracity and sanctioned only after due approval by the EC of SCAORA. That upon the scrutiny and sanction of the application by the EC of SCAORA, the SC AOR WELFARE TRUST will transfer the amount to the account of the concerned AOR/ eligible ADVOCATE.The sole discretion for approval and non-approval of applications under the said scheme shall vest exclusively with the EC of SCAORA.”The last date to apply for financial assistance under this scheme is May 31, 2020.Read the text of SCAORA Resolution :”18.05.2020Respected Members,* NEW SCAORA COVID-19 FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE SCHEME, 2020*In the virtual meeting of the EC of SCAORA held on 18.05.2020, it was resolved to introduce the NEW COVID-19 FINANCIAL SCHEME from 18.05.2020 to 31.05.2020, so as to extend the benefit of the scheme to all the Advocates on Record and Advocates who are members of the SCBA whose name appears in the SCBA voters list of 2019 and Advocates covered under special categories as defined in cl.2 who are in dire need of financial aid on account of the lockdown due to the pandemic COVID-19. It was further resolved that the terms of the said NEW COVID-19 FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE SCHEME, 2020 will be as here under;1. Any AOR and any Advocate who is regularly practicing in Supreme Court and is a member of SCBA whose name appears in the SCBA voters list of 2019 will be eligible for the benefits of the NEW COVID-19 FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE SCHEME, 2020.2. Any AOR and any eligible Advocate who wants to avail the benefits of the said scheme is required to furnish a declaration/undertaking wherein the following details need to be specified; a. AOR Code in case of an AOR and the SCBA membership number in case of eligible Advocate, along with a statement that his name appears in the SCBA voters list of 2019; b. The AOR or eligible Advocate applying under the said scheme are in dire need of financial aid and are facing grave financial hardships, on account of the lockdown due to the pandemic of COVID-19; c. The income of the AOR or the eligible Advocate availing the benefit of the scheme is less than Rs. 8 (Eight) Lakhs per annum;d. That no COVID-19 related assistance or benefit, including loan, has been received by the AOR or eligible Advocate, from any other Bar Association during this period.3. Subject to the approval of the EC of SCAORA, I. The aforesaid criteria in clause 1 can be relaxed exceptionally to any Advocate who is an active member of the SCBA, if the Advocate is: A. in dire need of financial aid due to certain medical conditions/situations.B. single women; II. Widow of AORs (since 2015)4. The following details of the AOR or the Advocate, availing the benefit of the Scheme, are to be mentioned in the body of the email along with the aforementioned Declaration:i. Full Name:ii. Date of Birth.iii. Mob. No.iv. Address:v. Email id:vi. AOR CODE / SCBA Membership No. vii. Whether he/she has a spouse who is a salaried employee – Yes Or No -viii. Whether he/she is living with the parents having fixed monthly income. Yes Or Noix. Whether living in a rented premises x. I.T. Returns , if any , of the preceding financial year. xi. Bank Account details:xii. Name of the Bank a) Name of the account holder as per the bank record b) Account Numberc) Type of Account d) Branch e) IFSC Code5. The identity of the AOR/Advocate seeking benefit under the Scheme will be kept strictly confidential.6.Each application will be scrutinized as to its veracity and sanctioned only after due approval by the EC of SCAORA. That upon the scrutiny and sanction of the application by the EC of SCAORA, the SC AOR WELFARE TRUST will transfer the amount to the account of the concerned AOR/ eligible ADVOCATE.7.The sole discretion for approval and non-approval of applications under the said scheme shall vest exclusively with the EC of SCAORA.8. The benefit of the new scheme is a onetime financial assistance offered, as an ex gratia amount of Rs.10,000/-.9.The last date for email of applications is 31.05.2020.The AORs and Advocates who are eligible may email applications bearing the aforesaid details to “[email protected] “Thanking You,Warm Regards,Joseph Aristotle S. Hony. Secretary, SCAORA”.Next Storylast_img read more

Reflections on justice delayed

first_imgThere was jubilation in the streets of Nairobi last Thursday after the British government announced a $30 million settlement for abuses by colonial authorities during Kenya’s Mau Mau rebellion in the 1950s. The settlement stemmed in large part from the work of Harvard History Professor Caroline Elkins, whose book “Imperial Reckoning,” which won the Pulitzer Prize in 2006, detailed the system of camps set up to hold some 1.5 million Mau Mau detainees and the horrific treatment, including murder, rape, and castration, that occurred with the knowledge of colonial and British authorities. The Gazette reached Elkins by phone in Nairobi to get her thoughts on the settlement, on what it means to the aged Mau Mau detainees, and the personal journey she has taken.GAZETTE: Can you explain what happened with the ruling?ELKINS: Thursday was an historic day. It was the day the British government finally decided to settle the Mau Mau case that was filed in the high court in 2009.The settlement has four components to it, the first of which is that the British government apologized, or issued an expression of “sincere regret,” for the tortures that had been committed by British colonial officials during Mau Mau.It then issued an approximately 19 million pounds sterling [about $30 million] payout to be divided between the approximately 5,200 claimants who are now part of the case. It also will be paying for a Mau Mau memorial in Nairobi, as well as the claimants’ litigation costs.This is the first time the British government in its modern empire had issued an apology like this. The apology was simultaneously read by the foreign secretary [William] Hague into the parliamentary record [in London] and read here [in Nairobi] by the British High Commissioner Christian Turner.GAZETTE: Some of our readers may not be familiar with Kenya’s Mau Mau rebellion. Can you give us some historical background?ELKINS: Mau Mau was an anti-colonial movement that took place between 1952 and 1960, largely involving the Kikuyu population, Kenya’s largest ethnic group. The British response to this was extraordinary. A lot of people think of Mau Mau as a horrible, savage movement. But only 32 Europeans were killed, whereas there were approximately a million and a half Kikuyu detained in detention camps and subjected to unimaginable tortures, as well as forced labor and other despicable acts.GAZETTE: What kind of torture occurred?ELKINS: The kinds of atrocities we’re talking about are just absolutely horrific: castrations, rapes, sodomies with foreign objects and broken bottles, tying Mau Mau suspects to the back of Land Rovers and driving off until they were just disintegrated into bits.It was a situation whereby not only were these horrors unthinkable and unspeakable, but they were happening with the full knowledge of the British colonial office in London, as well as the government here in Nairobi.GAZETTE: What’s your role been in all of this?ELKINS: The case itself is based upon my book, “Imperial Reckoning,” which was the topic of my doctoral dissertation. Many of the accounts were first recorded in my fieldwork. I conducted approximately 400 interviews in the late 1990s.For the last four years, I have been an expert witness to the case, which entailed a considerable amount of work and also involved bringing several graduate and undergraduate students into the project. We had vast amounts of documentation — new files that had been released in this case that had to be reviewed, and then expert testimony rendered.GAZETTE: Can you elaborate on the role of Harvard students?ELKINS: As so often happens in litigation, the process of discovery revealed an incredible cache of documents that the British government had been sitting on. As an expert witness, I had to review about 20,000 to 30,000 pages of documents in a very brief period of time in order to write a witness statement for the court.We had a team of five — myself, graduate students, and undergraduates — who were the self-proclaimed Team Mau Mau. We logged literally hundreds of hours of work. We scoured documents using a searchable database, met weekly and sometimes daily, and had lots of all-nighters and coffee.It was teaching and learning at its very, very best, and it was integral to the success of the research I had to do in order to write some of my briefs to the court.GAZETTE: How did you first get interested in the subject?ELKINS: During my undergraduate years at Princeton, I was doing senior thesis research here in Nairobi. I was looking at social change among Kikuyu from the pre-colonial period until after independence.I was here in the archives and found some documents related to the detention camps and looked for some secondary work on it. I found nothing, so I said if I ever went to graduate school this would be the subject of my doctoral dissertation. Sure enough, I came to Harvard in 1994, in the History Department, and two years later this was the topic of my doctoral dissertation.GAZETTE: Are there any guidelines as to how the settlement is to be used? ELKINS: There are no guidelines. There’s no Social Security here in Kenya, so much of this funding will help these elderly victims take care of themselves in their old age. Many of them need medical care and medications.In many African societies, younger generations take care of older generations. Many of the claimants lost their children during Mau Mau, lost spouses, so we saw a breakdown in the social network of caring for the elderly. We discussed one case today [of a man] who needs medication and couldn’t have children because he was castrated.So it’s all bound together. The social fabric that would often help take care of these individuals broke down because of Mau Mau, and the torture that took place.GAZETTE: What was the reaction in Nairobi when the settlement was announced?ELKINS: It was extraordinary. There was a news conference that lasted nearly two hours. Several hundred claimants were there. There were tears of joy, tears of sorrow. There was singing, dancing. It was really a deeply emotional experience on many levels.This has received enormous coverage here in Kenya, it’s pretty much what everyone’s talking about at the moment. I think there’s a sense that the British government is taking moral responsibility for what it’s done.GAZETTE: Is it the end of the legal story in Kenya?ELKINS: For the most part. [The law firm] Leigh Day and the Kenya [National] Commission on Human Rights have managed to vet a large majority of those who potentially have claims, but I would not go so far as to say that the door is fully closed on others with legitimate claims coming forward.GAZETTE: Is this the last word on this case?ELKINS: I think it’s the last word as far as the British government offering an apology and looking to make amends [in Kenya]. It was very clear during the news conference that the British are hoping this can be the first step in a process of reconciliation, and it’s a step many people thought they would never see. But I think you’re going to see this process, and these kinds of claims, being made in other parts of the [former] empire.GAZETTE: This has been a long journey for you as well. What are you personally feeling?ELKINS: Just a range of emotions. There’s some validation because my work was highly criticized, with some calling it a work of fiction. I took on both the book and [the role of] expert witness in the case at great professional peril. I did that because I felt strongly that this is something that needed to be done.There is nothing more satisfying than to see the impact this work has had on the individuals that I have worked with, taken oral history from, and who trusted me with their stories.It’s also immensely humbling. I was at the news conference on Thursday, and elderly Kikuyu were hugging me, thanking me. It was quite a moment.last_img read more

Varane accepts responsibility for errors in Real Madrid UCL defeat

first_imgReal Madrid defender Raphael Varane was in no mood for excuses after Los Blancos 2-1 Champions League last 16 second leg defeat at Manchester City. Goals from Raheem Sterling and Gabriel Jesus secured a 4-2 aggregate victory for Pep Guardiola’s side, however, it was Varane who was at fault for both goals. The French international lost possession to Jesus inside his own area on eight minutes, with the Brazilian squaring for Sterling to tap home. “I am sorry for my teammates. I am sad that we are out. This has not happened many times in my career. Loading… That mistake dented Varane’s trademarke calmness, as his poor second half headed clearance allowed Jesus to race clear and fire the winner past Thibaut Courtois. “I wanted to show my face. I got it wrong, this is on me, and we are out,” he told a post-match interview with El Chringuito. Read Also: JUST-IN: Man City win dumps Real Madrid out of Champions League “Now we must show character, because it has been a hard night.” Real Madrid exit the Champions League at the last 16 stage for the first time under Zidane, with the French boss losing his first ever Champions League knockout games home and away against City. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 last_img read more

Meals on Wheels cruises through a fruitful Wine for Wheels event

first_imgGreensburg, IN—Meals on Wheels held their annual Wine for Wheels fundraiser last Saturday, June 8 at the Knights of Columbus Hall.Attendees were able to sample several different regional wines and brews along with feast upon a delicious pork tenderloin dinner all for a great cause.  Along with the food and spirits, guests could enjoy musical entertainment and participate in a raffle.The evening event raised approximately $3,000.  Executive Director, Diana Robbins stated, “People in this town are always so generous to support Meals on Wheels and I’m lucky to live in Greensburg.”Greensburg Meals on Wheels delivers hot, well balanced, nutritional meals to people in the Decatur County area who are in need of them, focusing on those over 60.  For more information on the organization or to volunteer click here.last_img read more

New GPSS budget aims to repay, grow endowment

first_imgThe incoming Graduate and Professional Student Senate hopes to make better use of its increased revenue next year and use this year’s leftover funds to repay and grow its endowment.GPSS scored a major victory in August 2009 when it expanded its budget by almost $250,000. Before the 2009-2010 school year, graduate students taking fewer than six units were exempt from the $31 fee that students pay to GPSS each semester. Now, all 17,000 or so graduate students pay $31 per semester, regardless of course load.“That programming fee is our sole source of revenue,” said Johannes Schmitt, the current GPSS president. “We found that many students who weren’t paying the fee were using its fund, so we’ve been working for that fee expansion for the last four or five years.”The expansion, however, came with an administrative requirement: 80 percent of the additional revenue had to be allocated to the Conference Travel Fund, which pays for graduate students to attend events such as leadership conferences and case competitions around the United States.“The Conference Travel Fund was expanded by almost $200,000 this year,” Schmitt said. “We won’t spend even half of that — a conservative estimate is $75,000 — so we’re waiting to see whether we’ll have that 80 percent requirement again next year.”Irfan Elahi, the finance chair-elect, said he hopes to use that leftover money to help pay back and increase the endowment fund.GPSS borrowed $67,000 from the endowment fund three years ago and currently owes $32,000. In addition to paying that debt, Elahi wants to expand the endowment fund from $118,000 to $250,000 before the next school year begins.“My goal is to not only reverse that deficit but also increase the endowment, so we can earn interest and grow it further,” Elahi said.If the administrative requirement is lifted, GPSS also hopes to reduce the amount of money given to the Conference Travel Fund.Other aspects of the proposed budget include adding a Senator Leadership Development Fund, which will pay for $500 of travel for each of GPSS’ 70 senators to attend leadership conferences. The Senate has yet to approve the new fund.GPSS has also purchased $200,000 naming rights to a lounge in the Ronald Tutor Campus Center, which opens next fall. They plan to pay at least $40,000 next year, with the possibility of also allocating leftover funds to the new lounge.“We’ve said we’ll pay it back in five years, but with leftover funds in this new plan, we could do it in about two,” Elahi said.Elahi said the fee expansion has prevented any major cuts in GPSS funding avenues.“The increase in revenue has really allowed us to expand our budgets and create additional outflow,” Elahi said. “We’re not really cutting any areas next year because of the fee increase.”Expanding the Conference Travel Fund also allowed Elahi to expand the qualifications for reimbursement so more students can apply and receive funds.“I think it’s great that the funds are available, but I’ve found the application process difficult to navigate,” said Eli Lipmen, vice president of finance for the Annenberg School of Communication Masters Association. “I’ve been happy with the level of funding — we couldn’t have had our events without GPSS funds — but the process can be confusing.”Elahi is aware of the concerns about the reimbursement processes and has his own goals for its improvement.“Today’s chief complaint is that people say it takes five weeks to get approved and another five to get reimbursed,” he said. “We’re going to change those processes drastically next year. I want to get the approval processes down to two weeks and the reimbursement process to one week.”The new GPSS will ratify the budget in August 2010. Elahi will select the rest of his finance committee in early September.“We’ve just started discussing the new budget,” Elahi said. “I think we have great possibilities for improvement next year.”last_img read more